• The FACTS: Public WiFi in London

    During the Multi-Year Budget process, City Council approved my push to go forward and start offering free public access WiFi in our recreation centres; arenas, pools, community centres, where it does not already exist (there is an inequality across the city where some facilities have it, some don’t).

    This was a campaign promise I made and I’m happy to have council’s support in delivering this, with a 12-3 vote in favour.

    I also want to be clear, about misinformation being circulated saying WiFi services at the public library were cut and then council funded this instead.

    THAT IS 100% FALSE!

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  • Family Day Free Public Skate

  • The Ward 2 2019 Year in Review

    My first year as your city councillor has flown by, but it has been a very exciting and productive first year.

    In 2019 engaging the residents of Ward 2 has meant:

    • Hosting 3 public townhall meetings
    • Responding to over 2000 of your emails
    • An average of 4000 social media engagements a month

    I want to thank everyone who has taken the time to share your thoughts, ideas, questions and concerns. It is important for me to hear from you in order to bring our neighbourhood’s voice to London City Hall effectively.

    Of course, it is also about doing the work at City Hall as well and in my first year I’ve served on Council’s Civic Works and Community and Protective Services Committee, as well as Council’s representative on the Argyle BIA, Library, and Tourism London boards.

    I’m looking forward to continuing that work this year and am honoured to have the confidence of my fellow council members in taking on the additional role of Chairperson for the Community and Protective Services Committee for 2020.

    There are many Ward level needs and wants to work on as well. We have streets without any sidewalks, while other streets are badly in need of paving repairs. We have parks that need equipment repairs and other locations that need and are waiting for pedestrian crosswalks too. Of course there is also the need to keep working on affordable housing, better snow plowing, public wifi access at city facilities, and getting the green bin program started to name a few of the city wide initiatives I’m working on.

    And although I’m frustrated about the delays, I continue to work with our project team at the city to “get it done!” so that 2020 will finally see the opening of our new East Lion’s Community Centre.

    It will also be a challenging year as we work on the 2020-2023 Multi-year budget and work to deliver good services while keeping tax increases as reasonable as possible.

    I look forward to continuing to work with you, and for you, to make our community an even better place to live, work, and play than it already is.

    Wishing you a happy and prosperous New Year!

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  • Naming the EAST LIONS COMMUNITY CENTRE!

    In 1951 the newly chartered East London Lions Club purchased a block of land which they cleared for a baseball diamond and park. Continue Reading

  • Ward 2 Townhall Meeting

     

    Wednesday October 2nd

    6:30-8:30pm at the East London Library

    Join me and City Staff from the Budget team to discuss the upcoming multiyear budget, get an update on the community centre construction, and discuss the issues important to you.

     

  • Ward 2’s Vimy Ridge Park Becomes Official

    More than two years after it was opposed by the former Ward 2 Councillor and referred back to city staff to review other options, the Community and Protective Services Committee of London City Council unanimously endorses the motion by new Ward 2 Councillor Shawn Lewis to officially designate Vimy Ridge Park. Continue Reading

  • UPDATE ON EAST LONDON COMMUNITY CENTRE CONSTRUCTION

    Dear Argyle Residents,

    I know we’ve all been waiting a long time for the Argyle neighbourhood to get a proper community centre, over 19 years in fact.

    It was a privilege to stand with (then) Mayor Brown in the fall of 2017 and officially break ground on the construction site.

    And, it has been a disappointment to have the opening repeatedly pushed back from fall of 2018 to spring of 2019, to fall of 2019.

    Since being elected I’ve stopped by the work site and connected with the management team on a regular basis. I know they’ve been doing what they can.

    Unfortunately, it falls to me to share the bad news that we are still behind schedule.

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  • An Inside Look at Construction of the East London Community Centre

    Opening in the fall of 2019, even if it might not appear so from the roadside, construction of the East London Community Centre is moving along well.

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  • Ward 2 Gets $6 Million Infrastructure Renewal Approval

    During the election campaign one of the things I promised to do was to make the renewal of the Calgary, Churchill, Edmonton, Manitoba, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Whitney Street area of Ward 2 a priority.

    I was sworn in as your Councillor on December 4th. Getting started on this was my first priority and on December 5th I sat down with our City Engineer, Manager of Roads, and Director of Water and Wastewater. As you know, it is not just the roads that are in bad shape, sewer and drainage upgrades are needed as well, Whitney and Calgary Streets shouldn’t flood every time it rains. It was at this meeting that I learned that some of the drainage in the area dates back to the 1920’s and the City of London’s infrastructure renewal for this neighbourhood was not in the plans to be completed until 2029- 2030!!!

    I made it clear that wasn’t good enough. Not only had residents been led to belief for years that improvements were “just a couple of years away”, but the city was constructing a $20 million community centre in East Lion’s Park with no plan to upgrade the roads around it for another decade!

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  • The BRT Vote and Better Transit, What Does It All Mean?

    After almost 4 years of the Matt Brown led council insisting that their BRT plan absolutely had to be an all or nothing decision, staff clearly indicated to the new council that not only could the BRT plan be broken up into pieces and still be viable, but that other options besides the old BRT plan were available which could qualify for provincial and federal funding.

    A list of 19 projects came to council to decide which ones to submit for federal and provincial funding approval. These included; 5 component pieces of the old BRT plan, an intelligent traffic signal management system, bus stop amenities including 60 new bus shelters, the purchase of more buses, a portion of the Adelaide St. underpass design, an intersection improvement project for Wharncliffe & Oxford, Thames Valley Parkway connections, pedestrian connections to the transit network, new sidewalks, and three different cycling proposals along with a couple of others.

    What changed from the old BRT plan? Continue Reading